Father’s Day Gifts: Japanese Whiskies with Furoshiki Gift Wrap (Whisky Tasting In-Store on June 12th)

For the entire week leading up to Father’s Day, Wingtip will sell Japanese Whiskies wrapped in a limited edition furoshiki. Furoshiki is a style of Japanese fabric/tote bag that, since the 8th Century has been used to transport everything from clothes to lunch to whisky. Any purchase of Suntory Brands Japanese Whisky (Yamazaki, Hibiki, Hakushu) will be wrapped in these unique Father’s Day Prints while supplies last.

On Thursday, June 12th from noon—7pm on the Wingtip store floor, Neyah White, West Coast Brand Ambassador for Suntory brands will conduct a Japanese Whisky Tasting, featuring the Hakushu 12-year-old.

This will make a truly unique Father’s Day gift for the “father who has everything.”

A few words from Neyah White on The Hakushu:

If you are the least bit serious about whisky, I think that you are aware of the recent rise in Japanese Whisky popularity here in the US. Some confuse this as a sign that Japanese Whisky is new, when, in fact, the category is a full century old, with the first distillery, Yamazaki, celebrating its 90th anniversary just last year.

The Hakushu distillery was built exactly 50 years after Yamazaki as a source of varied flavors for producing Suntory’s blended portfolio. Fortunately for us, the blenders finally decided that the whisky market was ready to taste the Hakushu by itself in the 1990s, and it has been a favorite in Japan ever since.

The Hakushu is unique among single malts in that it is situated in the mountains. I know we think of the Scottish Highlands as having some altitude, but they are dwarfed by the ranges in Yamanashi. This has two distinct effects on the spirit. First, the water is snowmelt, coming down through granite rocks from 10,000 feet. This water is H2O and not much else, creating a freshness in the spirit unique among single malts. Second, the atmosphere at that altitude is very different from the anywhere whisky is aged. All locations provide their own fingerprint on aging whisky, but the pine trees and mountain flora of Hakushu make for an undeniably unique whisky.

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